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internet | Activist News | Page 2
Disobey

The Road to World War 3

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Edward Snowden

Open Letter To Obama

July 26, 2013 President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20500 Re: Civil Disobedience, Edward J. Snowden, and the Constitution Dear Mr. President: You are acutely aware More »

greed3

U.S. Companies Pay Just One-Third Of The Legal Tax Rate: GAO Study

Huffington Post July 1, 2013 By Mark Gongloff Big, profitable U.S. companies paid an average federal tax rate of less than 13 percent in 2010, according to a new study — or More »

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Man Tried for Chalk Drawings Found Not Guilty

NBC San Diego July 1, 2013 By Christina London The man accused of vandalism for drawing with chalk outside banks has been found not guilty on all charges. A jury returned its More »

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The Bigger Story Behind the AP Spying Scandal

Washington’s Blog/Global Research May 20, 2012 By George Washington Attack on the Press You know that the Department of Justice tapped scores of phone lines at the Associated Press. You might have More »

Tag Archives: internet

Activists warned to watch what they say as social media monitoring becomes ‘next big thing in law enforcement’

social-networking-sites2

The Independent
Oct. 1, 2012
By Kevin Rawlinson

Political activists must watch what they say on the likes of Facebook and Twitter, sites which will become the “next big thing in law enforcement”, a leading human rights lawyer has warned.

John Cooper QC said that police are monitoring key activists online and that officers and the courts are becoming increasingly savvy when it comes to social media. But, speaking to The Independent, he added that he also expected that to drive an increase in the number of criminals being brought to justice in the coming months.

“People involved in public protest should use social media to their strengths, like getting their message across. But they should not use them for things like discussing tactics. They might as well be having a tactical meeting with their opponents sitting in and listening.

“For example, if antifascist organisers were discussing their plans on social media, they can assume that a fascist organisation will be watching. Social media sites are the last place you want to post something like that,” he said.

Pirate Bay Founder Remains Locked Up Without Charges

Gottfrid Svartholm

TorrentFreak
Sept. 30, 2012

Gottfrid Svartholm will be kept in detention for at least two more weeks on suspicion of hacking into a Swedish IT company connected to the country’s tax authorities. According to Prosecutor Henry Olin the extended detention is needed “to prevent him from having contact with other people.” The Pirate Bay co-founder is not allowed to have visitors and is even being denied access to newspapers and television.

Following his arrest late last month, Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm was deported from Cambodia to Sweden.

Initially it was assumed that Gottfrid was sent to Sweden because of the outstanding one year prison sentence in the Pirate Bay case. However, once he touched down at Stockholm’s Arlanda Airport, the authorities said he was suspected of being involved in the hacking of Logica, a Swedish IT company that works with the local tax authorities.

As Occupy anniversary nears, Twitter gives up info on protester

Twitter

Los Angeles Times
Sept. 15, 2012
By Paloma Esquivel

In a case that civil liberty and Internet privacy advocates have been watching closely, Twitter on Friday handed over information about an Occupy Wall Street protester to a New York criminal court. The potential impact remains, as yet, unclear.

The New York district attorney’s office had subpoenaed more than three months worth of tweets from the Twitter account of Occupy Wall Street protester Malcolm Harris. The office also wanted account information. The tweets are no longer publicly available, so there was no way to retrieve them without the inside help.

Earlier this summer, the judge in the case ordered the company to turn over the records.

The company finally complied, turning over the messages and information this week, just days before the movement marks its one-year anniversary. Whether the Occupy protests will have any lasting impact, as some have begun to question, the Twitter case suggests that the movement’s ripple effect is continuing.

Twitter must produce Occupy protester’s tweets or face contempt

Blue-Bird-in-Jail

Reuters
Sept. 11, 2012
By Joseph Ax

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Twitter must hand over the tweets of an Occupy Wall Street protester to Manhattan prosecutors by Friday or face civil contempt and a hefty fine, a New York City judge said on Tuesday.

Manhattan Criminal Court Judge Matthew Sciarrino told a lawyer for Twitter that the San Francisco-based social media company had had 73 days to comply with his June 30 ruling ordering it to produce nearly three months’ worth of tweets from Malcolm Harris. The Occupy member was arrested during a mass march across the Brooklyn Bridge last October.

“You have until Friday to cure any potential contempt,” Sciarrino told Terryl Brown, the lawyer representing Twitter. If the company does not comply by then, he said, he would consider Twitter’s earning statements for the last two quarters in determining the appropriate fine.

Computer Hackers Target Cambodia

anonymouscamb

Wall Street Journal
Sept. 10, 2012
By James Hookway

Cambodia is the latest country to come under sustained attack from computer hackers after police in the tiny Southeast Asian country arrested one of the founders of The Pirate Bay file-sharing website last week.

A group calling itself NullCrew began hacking into government and commercial websites in the country after news of Gottfrid Svartholm Warg’s arrest broke over the weekend. Among other targets were websites for the Cambodian armed forces, the Ministry of Public Works and Cambodia’s Institute of Standards. NullCrew hackers then posted what they claimed were passwords to the websites on a bulletin page widely used by so-called hacktivist groups.

“The founder of The Pirate Bay was arrested in Cambodia, so Cambodia is now a target,” NullCrew said in a statement announcing the launch of what it calls #OpTPB—or operation The Pirate Bay.

“They should have expected it when they did this,” the group said. “Cambodia, we will not stop until you come to your senses.

What is the TPP, and why should you care?

tpp

Naked Security
Aug. 28, 2012
by Lachlan Urquhart

Remember the furore surrounding SOPA/PIPA in the US, or ACTA in the EU? It seems like acronym-tagged agreements with far-reaching IP agendas are causing quite a stir this year.

Now there is a new one to watch out for: TPP, the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Intellectual Property Chapter.

This multinational ‘free trade’ agreement has been under secret negotiation since 2008. Nine Pacific nations are at the table, including the US, Australia and New Zealand. It includes provisions that extend intellectual property protection and enforcement on an international plane.