Warning: preg_match() [function.preg-match]: Unknown modifier 't' in /home/content/16/9506716/html/wp-content/plugins/mobile-website-builder-for-wordpress-by-dudamobile/dudamobile.php on line 603
civil liberties | Activist News | Page 2
Disobey

The Road to World War 3

  More »

Edward Snowden

Open Letter To Obama

July 26, 2013 President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20500 Re: Civil Disobedience, Edward J. Snowden, and the Constitution Dear Mr. President: You are acutely aware More »

greed3

U.S. Companies Pay Just One-Third Of The Legal Tax Rate: GAO Study

Huffington Post July 1, 2013 By Mark Gongloff Big, profitable U.S. companies paid an average federal tax rate of less than 13 percent in 2010, according to a new study — or More »

jeff olsen

Man Tried for Chalk Drawings Found Not Guilty

NBC San Diego July 1, 2013 By Christina London The man accused of vandalism for drawing with chalk outside banks has been found not guilty on all charges. A jury returned its More »

freedom-of-the-press

The Bigger Story Behind the AP Spying Scandal

Washington’s Blog/Global Research May 20, 2012 By George Washington Attack on the Press You know that the Department of Justice tapped scores of phone lines at the Associated Press. You might have More »

Tag Archives: civil liberties

Shock Video: Cop Protects First Amendment

Airport Security

Infowars
Nov. 27, 2012
By Paul Joseph Watson

A shocking video has emerged of a police officer who abides by the oath he swore to uphold the constitution by defending the free speech rights of activists who were targeted by airport officials during the opt out and film campaign.

The clip shows activists Ashley Jessica and Jason Bermas handing out flyers warning travelers about the dangers of x-ray body scanners at Albany International Airport in New York.

Almost as soon as the activists begin to hand out the flyers, they are confronted by an aggressive airport official later named as Douglas I. Myers, the airport’s Director of Public Affairs.

Masks banned in Canadian riots, just in time for Anonymous day of action

Remember-remember-the-5th-of-november

naked Security
Nov. 5, 2012
By Lisa Vaas

Monday November 5th is Guy Fawkes Day.

Expect masks.

The Anonymous-affiliated are planning worldwide protests against government surveillance, as the following video declares:

As always, Anonymous supporters are likely to don masks with the image of their patron saint.

But for the first time, the smiling black and white masks that shield the identity of those protesters will be illegal in Canada (if the protest stops being peaceful).

It’s not only the Anonymous-affiliated whose masks will be banned. Canada’s House of Commons on Wednesday approved a bill that bans people from hiding their faces at all during riots.

US Homeland Security sued for drone details

PoliceDrone

AFP
Oct. 31, 2012

SAN FRANCISCO — The Electronic Frontier Foundation said Wednesday it has sued the US Department of Homeland Security to obtain details about Predator drones on loan to domestic police departments.

EFF Internet freedom and privacy champions contended that they filed suit in federal court in San Francisco because the DHS failed to respond to a Freedom of Information Act request for the information.

A DHS division uses unmanned drones in the United States to patrol borders but reports indicate that missions are being flown on behalf of local and federal law enforcement agencies, according to the EFF.

US Supreme Court lets wiretapping immunity stand

Cell-Phone-Monitoring-Application

AFP
Oct. 09, 2012

WASHINGTON — The US Supreme Court let stand Tuesday an immunity law on wiretapping viewed by government as a useful anti-terror tool but criticized by rights activists as a flagrant abuse of executive power.

The top US court declined to review a December 2011 appeals court decision that rejected a lawsuit against AT&T for helping the National Security Agency monitor its customers’ phone calls and Internet traffic.

Plaintiffs argue that the law allows the executive branch to conduct “warrantless and suspicionless domestic surveillance” without fear of review by the courts and at the sole discretion of the attorney general.

But President Barack Obama’s administration has argued to keep the immunity law in place, saying it would imperil national security to end such cooperation between the intelligence agencies and telecom companies.

Judge dismisses charges against 92 Occupy Chicago demonstrators

chicago1

Reuters
Sept. 27, 2012

CHICAGO (Reuters) – A Cook County judge on Thursday dismissed charges against 92 people arrested last October during two anti-Wall Street Occupy demonstrations in Chicago and said a rarely applied city curfew law violated their constitutional right to free assembly.

Police arrested more than 300 people during the protests for violating a city ordinance when they did not leave a park near Lake Michigan when it closed at 11 p.m. Violation of a city ordinance was the lowest possible misdemeanor charge.

The demonstrations were held in Grant Park, which was the site of large protests against the Vietnam War during the Democratic Party’s convention in Chicago in 1968. The area has been a gathering point since 1835, two years before the city was incorporated.

The demonstrators contended the curfew was unconstitutional because it acted as a blanket bar on all speech and was enforced arbitrarily against them. The city said it was applied regardless of speech and the demonstrators had other avenues in which they could communicate.

University of Calif agrees to pay $1M to settle lawsuit by students who were pepper-sprayed

pepper

Associated Press
Sept. 26, 2012

SAN FRANCISCO — The University of California has agreed to pay $1 million to settle a lawsuit filed by demonstrators who were pepper-sprayed during an Occupy protest at UC Davis last fall, according to a preliminary settlement filed Wednesday.

The Nov. 18, 2011, incident prompted national outrage, angry campus protests and calls for the resignation of Chancellor Linda Katehi after online videos shot by witnesses went viral.

Images of a police officer casually spraying orange pepper-spray in the faces of nonviolent protesters became a rallying symbol for the Occupy Wall Street movement. The demonstrators had been protesting steep tuition hikes and police brutality.

Under the proposed settlement, UC would pay $30,000 to each of 21 plaintiffs named in the complaint and an additional $250,000 for their attorneys to split.

Pepper-spraying campus police won’t face charges

pepper

Associated Press

Sept. 20, 2012

DAVIS, Calif. (AP) — The University of California, Davis police officers who doused students and alumni with pepper spray during a campus protest last November won’t face criminal charges, prosecutors said Wednesday.

The chemical crackdown prompted widespread condemnation, campus protests and calls for the resignation of Chancellor Linda Katehi after videos shot by witnesses were widely played online. Images of an officer casually spraying orange pepper-spray in the faces of nonviolent protesters became a rallying point for the Occupy Wall Street movement.

But the Yolo County District Attorney’s office said in a statement that there was insufficient evidence to prove the use of force was illegal.

A task force appointed by the university concluded in April that the Nov. 18 pepper-spraying was “objectively unreasonable” and could have been prevented.

Occupy Wall Street protesters: Protect them, recognize human rights begin at home

occupyagain

Washington Post
Sept. 17, 2012
By

The police crackdown on the Occupy Wall Street movement, since its beginning one- year ago today on Sept. 17, 2011, undermines core American values of freedom in the eyes of the world.

Particularly now, when extremist religious rhetoric is being used (and abused) to spark anti-American demonstrations around the world, this is an especially important time for the practice of respect for freedom of speech and freedom of assembly, freedoms that are indispensable to the freedom of religion and the practice of democracy, to be on display in the United States.

Instead, what the world is seeing is photos of arrests of Occupy protesters as they attempt to take their message of Wall Street’s responsibility for the nation’s economic meltdown to the streets once again and call for policies that support economic equality and fairness.

Suppressing the message of Occupy Wall Street is wrong on many levels, both political and religious. It is anti-democratic, and also, in my view as a Christian pastor and teacher, in contradiction to the message at the center of the teaching of Jesus of Nazareth of caring for the poor, and rejecting violence.

As Occupy anniversary nears, Twitter gives up info on protester

Twitter

Los Angeles Times
Sept. 15, 2012
By Paloma Esquivel

In a case that civil liberty and Internet privacy advocates have been watching closely, Twitter on Friday handed over information about an Occupy Wall Street protester to a New York criminal court. The potential impact remains, as yet, unclear.

The New York district attorney’s office had subpoenaed more than three months worth of tweets from the Twitter account of Occupy Wall Street protester Malcolm Harris. The office also wanted account information. The tweets are no longer publicly available, so there was no way to retrieve them without the inside help.

Earlier this summer, the judge in the case ordered the company to turn over the records.

The company finally complied, turning over the messages and information this week, just days before the movement marks its one-year anniversary. Whether the Occupy protests will have any lasting impact, as some have begun to question, the Twitter case suggests that the movement’s ripple effect is continuing.

Obama campaign brags about its whistleblower persecutions

whistleblower

Guardian
Sept. 5, 2012
By

For several decades, protection of whistleblowers has been a core political value for Democrats, at least for progressives. Daniel Ellsberg has long been viewed by liberals as an American hero for his disclosure of the top secret Pentagon Papers. In 2008, candidate Obama hailed whistleblowing as “acts of courage and patriotism”, which “should be encouraged rather than stifled as they have been during the Bush administration”.

President Obama, however, has waged the most aggressive and vindictive assault on whistleblowers of any president in American history, as even political magazines generally supportive of him have recognized and condemned. One might think that, as the party’s faithful gather to celebrate the greatness of this leader, this fact would be a minor problem, a source of some tension between Obama and his hardest-core supporters, perhaps even some embarrassment. One would be wrong.

Far from shying away from this record of persecuting whistleblowers, the Obama campaign is proudly boasting of it. A so-called “Truth Team” of the Obama/Biden 2012 campaign issued a document responding to allegations that the Obama White House has leaked classified information in order to glorify the president: