Edward Snowden

Open Letter To Obama

July 26, 2013 President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20500 Re: Civil Disobedience, Edward J. Snowden, and the Constitution Dear Mr. President: You are acutely aware More »

greed3

U.S. Companies Pay Just One-Third Of The Legal Tax Rate: GAO Study

Huffington Post July 1, 2013 By Mark Gongloff Big, profitable U.S. companies paid an average federal tax rate of less than 13 percent in 2010, according to a new study — or More »

jeff olsen

Man Tried for Chalk Drawings Found Not Guilty

NBC San Diego July 1, 2013 By Christina London The man accused of vandalism for drawing with chalk outside banks has been found not guilty on all charges. A jury returned its More »

freedom-of-the-press

The Bigger Story Behind the AP Spying Scandal

Washington’s Blog/Global Research May 20, 2012 By George Washington Attack on the Press You know that the Department of Justice tapped scores of phone lines at the Associated Press. You might have More »

anon

‘Anonymous’ Hacker Explains Why He Fled The US

Business Insider Mar. 2, 2012 By Michael Kelley Anonymous is front and center these days: the amorphous hacktivist group has been publishing internal data of U.S. banks while prominent members are prosecuted More »

Monthly Archives: August 2012

Software Meant to Fight Crime Is Used to Spy on Dissidents

fin

New York Times
Aug. 30, 2012
By

SAN FRANCISCO — Morgan Marquis-Boire works as a Google engineer and Bill Marczak is earning a Ph.D. in computer science. But this summer, the two men have been moonlighting as detectives, chasing an elusive surveillance tool from Bahrain across five continents.

What they found was the widespread use of sophisticated, off-the-shelf computer espionage software by governments with questionable records on human rights. While the software is supposedly sold for use only in criminal investigations, the two came across evidence that it was being used to target political dissidents.

The software proved to be the stuff of a spy film: it can grab images of computer screens, record Skype chats, turn on cameras and microphones and log keystrokes. The two men said they discovered mobile versions of the spyware customized for all major mobile phones.

Amazonian community wiped out by illegal goldminers

indians-eating

Telegraph
Aug. 30, 2012
By

The charred remains of dozens of Yanomami Indians were discovered inside the village “shabono” in the remote community of Irotatheri on the southern Venezuelan border with Brazil.

A shabono is a circular hut that typically houses dozens of tribesmen and women.

Three survivors were found walking in the jungle after the attack, having fled at the sound of gunshots, explosions and the sound of a helicopter while they were out hunting.

US withheld evidence in WikiLeaks case

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AFP
Aug. 29, 2012

FORT MEADE: Lawyers for the US soldier charged with passing a trove of classified documents to WikiLeaks accused the military Tuesday of withholding hundreds of emails over fears of a publicity nightmare.

The defense team for Private Bradley Manning, who could be jailed for life for “aiding the enemy” over the massive security breach, alleged that more than 1,300 messages were ignored by prosecutors for at least six months.

The emails relate to the conditions the 24-year-old trooper was held in during military detention at Quantico, Virginia, where he was sent after a spell in a US Army jail in Kuwait following his arrest while on duty in Iraq in 2010.

Convention protesters try to arrest Condi Rice

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Associated Press
Aug. 28, 2012
By MIKE SCHNEIDER

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Police in Tampa stopped a dozen anti-war protesters from entering an event attended by former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice after the group said it intended to arrest her for war crimes.

The protesters from Code Pink carried handcuffs Tuesday and tried to enter a performing arts center. Rice was attending an event in conjunction with the Republican National Convention. They said they wanted to make a citizen’s arrest of Rice. She was George W. Bush’s National Security Adviser when the Iraq War started in 2003.

Officers told protesters to leave because they were on private property. They went back to the sidewalk and several lay down under sheets made to look like they were blood-splattered.

Full Article Here -  http://news.yahoo.com/convention-protesters-try-arrest-condi-rice-175724854–election.html

Rachel Corrie’s verdict highlights Israel’s disregard for justice

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gulfnews.com
Aug. 28, 2012

It’s been nearly a decade since American peace activist Rachel Corrie was crushed to death by an Israeli army bulldozer as she tried to block its path in the Gaza Strip.

The bulldozer was about to demolish a home in Rafah, part of systematic house demolitions undertaken by Israeli forces as a response to mortar attacks by Palestinians.

On Tuesday, a court in Israel ruled that the death of the 23-year-old activist was an accident, a verdict in a civil suit brought by Corrie’s parents against the military. If Corrie’s mother, Cindy, had honestly expected any other verdict, she would have been sadly mistaken — there simply is no justice for Palestinians, and certainly not in the courts nor judicial system of a state which has illegally occupied their homes, demolished their houses, killed and repressed them, and ignored the most basic and fundamental of human rights for the past six decades.

What is the TPP, and why should you care?

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Naked Security
Aug. 28, 2012
by Lachlan Urquhart

Remember the furore surrounding SOPA/PIPA in the US, or ACTA in the EU? It seems like acronym-tagged agreements with far-reaching IP agendas are causing quite a stir this year.

Now there is a new one to watch out for: TPP, the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Intellectual Property Chapter.

This multinational ‘free trade’ agreement has been under secret negotiation since 2008. Nine Pacific nations are at the table, including the US, Australia and New Zealand. It includes provisions that extend intellectual property protection and enforcement on an international plane.

113 arrested in Chile student protests

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AFP
Aug. 23, 2012

Over a hundred students were arrested in Santiago in clashes between police and demonstrators demanding better public education, after the occupation of several schools.

Some 4,500 students, mostly from high schools and universities, took to the streets to demand improvements in Chile’s public education system, said to be among the most expensive and unequal in the world.

Santiago authorities said 113 people were arrested in various parts of the city, including 39 adults and 74 minors.

Detained Marine veteran now released, per judge’s order

brandon-raub

WTVR.com
Aug. 23, 2012
By and

HOPEWELL, Va. (WTVR) – A Hopewell circuit court judge has ordered that a Marine veteran detained over anti-government Facebook posts be released from a psychiatric hospital.

CBS 6 News’ Catie Beck said the Judge Allan Sharrett dismissed the case Thursday against Brandon Raub. The judge said the original petition for Raub’s detention contained no facts. In other words, there was no information on why Raub was being held — and the judge deemed this violated his civil liberties.

Anonymous hits UK government websites in Assange protest

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BBC News
Aug. 21, 2012

Computer hacking collective Anonymous says it has attacked government websites in retaliation for the UK’s handling of the Julian Assange case.

It claimed responsibility on Twitter for the denial-of-service attacks.

Websites affected include the Ministry of Justice and the Home Office.

The Wikileaks founder is staying at Ecuador’s embassy in London to avoid extradition to Sweden over sex assault claims, which he denies. He was granted asylum by the country last week.

He has been at the embassy since June and on Sunday addressed crowds of his supporters from the embassy’s balcony, thanking Ecuador and other South American countries for their support.

WikiLeaks and Free Speech

assange

New York Times
Aug. 20, 2012
By MICHAEL MOORE and OLIVER STONE

WE have spent our careers as filmmakers making the case that the news media in the United States often fail to inform Americans about the uglier actions of our own government. We therefore have been deeply grateful for the accomplishments of WikiLeaks, and applaud Ecuador’s decision to grant diplomatic asylum to its founder, Julian Assange, who is now living in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London.

Ecuador has acted in accordance with important principles of international human rights. Indeed, nothing could demonstrate the appropriateness of Ecuador’s action more than the British government’s threat to violate a sacrosanct principle of diplomatic relations and invade the embassy to arrest Mr. Assange.

Since WikiLeaks’ founding, it has revealed the “Collateral Murder” footage that shows the seemingly indiscriminate killing of Baghdad civilians by a United States Apache attack helicopter; further fine-grained detail about the true face of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars; United States collusion with Yemen’s dictatorship to conceal our responsibility for bombing strikes there; the Obama administration’s pressure on other nations not to prosecute Bush-era officials for torture; and much more.