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2011 October 3 | Activist News
Disobey

The Road to World War 3

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Edward Snowden

Open Letter To Obama

July 26, 2013 President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20500 Re: Civil Disobedience, Edward J. Snowden, and the Constitution Dear Mr. President: You are acutely aware More »

greed3

U.S. Companies Pay Just One-Third Of The Legal Tax Rate: GAO Study

Huffington Post July 1, 2013 By Mark Gongloff Big, profitable U.S. companies paid an average federal tax rate of less than 13 percent in 2010, according to a new study — or More »

jeff olsen

Man Tried for Chalk Drawings Found Not Guilty

NBC San Diego July 1, 2013 By Christina London The man accused of vandalism for drawing with chalk outside banks has been found not guilty on all charges. A jury returned its More »

freedom-of-the-press

The Bigger Story Behind the AP Spying Scandal

Washington’s Blog/Global Research May 20, 2012 By George Washington Attack on the Press You know that the Department of Justice tapped scores of phone lines at the Associated Press. You might have More »

Daily Archives: October 3, 2011

Arab Spring bloggers to meet in Tunis

AFP
Oct. 2, 2011

Some 200 Arab bloggers involved in cyberactivism will gather in Tunis Monday to discuss the role of the Internet and social networking in political change following the “Arab Spring”, organisers said.
Following on gatherings in Beirut in 2008 and 2009, the third meeting of Arab bloggers will focus on the role of cyberactivists in a period of political transition, Malek Khadraoui, event organiser and administrator of the Tunisian site Nawaat, told AFP.
“It is an exceptional meeting. There have been three Arab revolutions and the majority of the invited bloggers have been involved in these revolutions, which will allow them to meet and develop solidarity networks,” he said.

“We will reflect together on new challenges facing movements in countries like Syria, Bahrain, Yemen,” Khadraoui added, underlining the symbolism of holding the meeting in Tunisia, the birthplace of the Arab Spring.
The Arab bloggers will look at their role in political life, notably in Tunisia where seven of them are candidates in the October 23 constituent assembly elections, as well as the role of Wikileaks in the Arab revolutions, and the reliability of information on Twitter or Facebook.

Full Article Here – http://news.yahoo.com/arab-spring-bloggers-meet-tunis-191522141.html

Wall Street protesters: We’re in for the long haul

Associated Press
Oct. 2, 2011
By VERENA DOBNIK

NEW YORK – The protesters who have been camping out in Manhattan’s Financial District for more than two weeks eat donated food and keep their laptops running with a portable gas-powered generator. They have a newspaper — the Occupied Wall Street Journal — and a makeshift hospital.

They lack a clear objective, though they speak against corporate greed, social inequality, global climate change and other concerns. But they’re growing in numbers, getting more organized and showing no sign of quitting.

City officials “thought we were going to leave and we haven’t left,” 19-year-old protester Kira Moyer-Sims said. “We’re going to stay as long as we can.”


The arrests of more than 700 people on Saturday as thousands tried to cross the Brooklyn Bridge seemed to pour oil on the rage of those who camped out overnight in Zuccotti Park, a private plaza off Broadway near Wall Street.

The growing, cross-country movement “signals a shift in consciousness,” said Jared Schy, a young man sitting squeezed between three others who participated in Saturday’s march from Manhattan’s Financial District to the bridge.

“We don’t care whether mainstream media covers this or people see us on television. What counts are the more than 30,000 viewers following our online live stream,” he said. “We heard from a lot of them, and they’re joining us now!”

The Occupy Wall Street demonstration started out last month with fewer than a dozen college students spending days and nights in Zuccotti Park. It has grown significantly, both in New York City and elsewhere as people across the country, from Boston to Los Angeles, display their solidarity in similar protests.

Moyer-Sims, of Portland, Ore., said the group has grown much more organized. “We have a protocol for most things,” she said, including getting legal help for people who are arrested.

The protest has drawn activists of diverse ages and occupations, including Jackie Fellner, a marketing manager from Westchester County.

“We’re not here to take down Wall Street. It’s not poor against rich. It’s about big money dictating which politicians get elected and what programs get funded,” she said.

On Sunday, a group of New York public school teachers sat in the plaza, including Denise Martinez of Brooklyn. Most students at her school live at or below the poverty level, and her classes are jammed with up to about 50 students.

“These are America’s future workers, and what’s trickling down to them are the problems — the unemployment, the crime,” she said. She blamed Wall Street for causing the country’s financial problems and said it needed to do more to solve them.

Full Article Here – http://old.news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20111002/ap_on_re_us/us_wall_street_protest

Anonymous Launches Investigative Research Branch

Truthdig
Oct. 2, 2011


The hacker collective Anonymous launched a division devoted to investigative reporting last month, marking a departure from the group’s traditional practice of exposing corporations through hacking attacks.

Anonymous Analytics will bring together “analysts, forensic accountants, statisticians, computer experts and lawyers from various jurisdictions and backgrounds” to reveal corporate corruption through detailed reports, the group said on its website.

All research will be fact checked and vetted for authenticity before release, it said, and sources can provide tips via an encrypted drop box. The group published one report already: a lengthy and seemingly well-researched review of Chinese agricultural firm Chaoda Modern Agriculture. 

Shell oil paid Nigerian military to put down protests, court documents show

Guardian
Oct. 2, 2011
By

Shell has never denied that its oil operations have polluted large areas of the Niger Delta – land and air. But it had resisted charges of complicity in human rights abuses.

Court documents now reveal that in the 1990s Shell routinely worked with Nigeria‘s military and mobile police to suppress resistance to its oil activities, often from activists in Ogoniland, in the delta region.

Confidential memos, faxes, witness statements and other documents, released in 2009, show the company regularly paid the military to stop the peaceful protest movement against the pollution, even helping to plan raids on villages suspected of opposing the company.


According to Ogoni activists, several thousand people were killed in the 1990s and many more fled that wave of terror that took place in the 1990s.

In 2009, in a New York federal court, that evidence never saw light during the trial. Shell had been accused of collaborating with the state in the execution in 1995 of writer Ken Saro-Wiwa and other leaders of the Ogoni tribe. Instead, Shell paid $15.5m (£9.6m) to the eight families in settlement.

Among the documents was a 1994 letter from Shell agreeing to pay a unit of the Nigerian army to retrieve a truck, an action that left one Ogoni man dead and two wounded. Shell said it was making the payment “as a show of gratitude and motivation for a sustained favourable disposition in future assignments”.

Brian Anderson, the director of Shell Nigeria during those years, said in 2009, after the New York settlement, the company had “played no part in any military operations against the Ogoni people, or any other communities in the Niger Delta, and we have never been approached for financial or logistical support for any action”.

But he conceded that Shell had paid the military on two occasions.

The company has been sued many times over its conduct in Nigeria. Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch (HRW) say oil companies working in the delta, of which Shell is the largest, have overseen a “human rights tragedy”. Most of the alleged human rights abuses, they say, follow the companies’ refusal to abide by acceptable environmental standards.

Despite the flood of lawsuits, cases can be delayed for years. Very few people are able to take on the oil giant, which has 90 oil fields in the delta where it has operated since the 1950s.

Increasingly, though, international groups are using courts in Europe and the US against big oil companies. Shell’s Nigerian subsidiary SPDC admitted liability last month in a British court for two oil spills in 2008 around Bodo, which has severely affected the lives of 69,000 people. The company is negotiating a settlement. A similar case is being heard in a Netherlands court for three other spills.
 
Full Article Here – http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/oct/03/shell-oil-paid-nigerian-military?CMP=twt_fd