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Internet | Activist News | Page 2
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The Road to World War 3

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Edward Snowden

Open Letter To Obama

July 26, 2013 President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20500 Re: Civil Disobedience, Edward J. Snowden, and the Constitution Dear Mr. President: You are acutely aware More »

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U.S. Companies Pay Just One-Third Of The Legal Tax Rate: GAO Study

Huffington Post July 1, 2013 By Mark Gongloff Big, profitable U.S. companies paid an average federal tax rate of less than 13 percent in 2010, according to a new study — or More »

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Man Tried for Chalk Drawings Found Not Guilty

NBC San Diego July 1, 2013 By Christina London The man accused of vandalism for drawing with chalk outside banks has been found not guilty on all charges. A jury returned its More »

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The Bigger Story Behind the AP Spying Scandal

Washington’s Blog/Global Research May 20, 2012 By George Washington Attack on the Press You know that the Department of Justice tapped scores of phone lines at the Associated Press. You might have More »

Category Archives: Internet

Internet Hangs in Balance as World Governments Meet in Secret

internet

Wired
Dec. 3, 2012
By David Kravets

There’s a lot of sky-is-falling doomsday predictions about the World Conference on International Telecommunications, which opens Monday in Dubai with some 190-plus nations discussing the global internet’s future.

That’s because much of the accompanying proposals from the global community have been kept under lock and key, although some of the positions of nations have been leaked and published online.

The idea behind the meetings is to update the International Telecommunications Regulations governed by the International Telecommunications Union, a United Nations agency known as the ITU, that is responsible for global communication technologies.

Bradley Manning offers partial guilty plea in WikiLeaks case

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Guardian
Nov. 8, 2012
By

Bradley Manning, the US soldier who is facing life in prison for allegedly having leaked hundreds of thousands of state secrets to WikiLeaks, has indicated publicly for the first time that he accepts responsibility for handing some information to the whistleblower website.

Manning’s defence lawyer, David Coombs, told a pre-trial hearing ahead of his court martial that the soldier wanted to offer a guilty plea for some offences contained within the US government’s case against him. This is the first time the intelligence analyst has given any public indication that he accepts that he played a part in the breach of confidential US material.

The statement is technically known as “pleading by exceptions and substitutions”. By taking this legal route, Manning is not pleading guilty to any of the 22 charges brought against him, and nor is he making a plea bargain. He is asking the court to rule on whether his plea accepting limited responsibility is admissible in the case. Coombs set out the details in a statement that was posted on his website after the hearing.

Anonymous Claims To Have Hacked 28,000 PayPal Passwords For Guy Fawkes Day

anonymous3

Huffington Post
Nov. 5, 2012
By

Anonymous, which adopted the Guy Fawkes mask, designed by “V for Vendetta” illustrator David Llyod, as a symbol for its social crusade, has decided to celebrate Guy Fawkes Day with some good, old-fashioned hacking.

Guy Fawkes Day is observed annually on Nov. 5 in commemoration of the rebel Englishman’s demise.

Marking Nov. 5 as a day of global protest, hacker group Anonymous began its tribute on Sunday night by allegedly hacking a PayPal server and stealing 28,000 customer passwords, The Next Web reports. Anonymous announced the hack on Twitter, “linking to a set of Private Paste documents containing emails, names, and what appear to be possibly passwords from the payment service’s database,” according to TNW.

The head of public relations for PayPal, however, denied the Anonymous attack, tweeting, “We’re investigating this but to date we have been unable to find any evidence that validates this claim.”

Activists warned to watch what they say as social media monitoring becomes ‘next big thing in law enforcement’

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The Independent
Oct. 1, 2012
By Kevin Rawlinson

Political activists must watch what they say on the likes of Facebook and Twitter, sites which will become the “next big thing in law enforcement”, a leading human rights lawyer has warned.

John Cooper QC said that police are monitoring key activists online and that officers and the courts are becoming increasingly savvy when it comes to social media. But, speaking to The Independent, he added that he also expected that to drive an increase in the number of criminals being brought to justice in the coming months.

“People involved in public protest should use social media to their strengths, like getting their message across. But they should not use them for things like discussing tactics. They might as well be having a tactical meeting with their opponents sitting in and listening.

“For example, if antifascist organisers were discussing their plans on social media, they can assume that a fascist organisation will be watching. Social media sites are the last place you want to post something like that,” he said.

Pirate Bay Founder Remains Locked Up Without Charges

Gottfrid Svartholm

TorrentFreak
Sept. 30, 2012

Gottfrid Svartholm will be kept in detention for at least two more weeks on suspicion of hacking into a Swedish IT company connected to the country’s tax authorities. According to Prosecutor Henry Olin the extended detention is needed “to prevent him from having contact with other people.” The Pirate Bay co-founder is not allowed to have visitors and is even being denied access to newspapers and television.

Following his arrest late last month, Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm was deported from Cambodia to Sweden.

Initially it was assumed that Gottfrid was sent to Sweden because of the outstanding one year prison sentence in the Pirate Bay case. However, once he touched down at Stockholm’s Arlanda Airport, the authorities said he was suspected of being involved in the hacking of Logica, a Swedish IT company that works with the local tax authorities.

As Occupy anniversary nears, Twitter gives up info on protester

Twitter

Los Angeles Times
Sept. 15, 2012
By Paloma Esquivel

In a case that civil liberty and Internet privacy advocates have been watching closely, Twitter on Friday handed over information about an Occupy Wall Street protester to a New York criminal court. The potential impact remains, as yet, unclear.

The New York district attorney’s office had subpoenaed more than three months worth of tweets from the Twitter account of Occupy Wall Street protester Malcolm Harris. The office also wanted account information. The tweets are no longer publicly available, so there was no way to retrieve them without the inside help.

Earlier this summer, the judge in the case ordered the company to turn over the records.

The company finally complied, turning over the messages and information this week, just days before the movement marks its one-year anniversary. Whether the Occupy protests will have any lasting impact, as some have begun to question, the Twitter case suggests that the movement’s ripple effect is continuing.

Twitter must produce Occupy protester’s tweets or face contempt

Blue-Bird-in-Jail

Reuters
Sept. 11, 2012
By Joseph Ax

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Twitter must hand over the tweets of an Occupy Wall Street protester to Manhattan prosecutors by Friday or face civil contempt and a hefty fine, a New York City judge said on Tuesday.

Manhattan Criminal Court Judge Matthew Sciarrino told a lawyer for Twitter that the San Francisco-based social media company had had 73 days to comply with his June 30 ruling ordering it to produce nearly three months’ worth of tweets from Malcolm Harris. The Occupy member was arrested during a mass march across the Brooklyn Bridge last October.

“You have until Friday to cure any potential contempt,” Sciarrino told Terryl Brown, the lawyer representing Twitter. If the company does not comply by then, he said, he would consider Twitter’s earning statements for the last two quarters in determining the appropriate fine.

Computer Hackers Target Cambodia

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Wall Street Journal
Sept. 10, 2012
By James Hookway

Cambodia is the latest country to come under sustained attack from computer hackers after police in the tiny Southeast Asian country arrested one of the founders of The Pirate Bay file-sharing website last week.

A group calling itself NullCrew began hacking into government and commercial websites in the country after news of Gottfrid Svartholm Warg’s arrest broke over the weekend. Among other targets were websites for the Cambodian armed forces, the Ministry of Public Works and Cambodia’s Institute of Standards. NullCrew hackers then posted what they claimed were passwords to the websites on a bulletin page widely used by so-called hacktivist groups.

“The founder of The Pirate Bay was arrested in Cambodia, so Cambodia is now a target,” NullCrew said in a statement announcing the launch of what it calls #OpTPB—or operation The Pirate Bay.

“They should have expected it when they did this,” the group said. “Cambodia, we will not stop until you come to your senses.

Anonymous begins dump of stolen ISP data

ZD Net
July 28, 2012
By

Anonymous Australia has followed through with its promise to dump of what appears to be AAPT’s customer data, releasing a sample of the stolen data.

The data was posted in several parts; six on Pastebin (one, two, three, four, five, and six), and four dump files. The information in these dumps appears to be about AAPT’s business accounts and the contacts for these agreements.

The data appears to contain information about AAPT business customers and staff, including the names, numbers, titles and email addresses of a contact for each business agreement and how much the company spends (presumably with AAPT) each month. AAPT confirmed earlier this week that its data had been breached via its provider Melbourne IT, but had not said whether Anonymous was behind the breach. ZDNet has contacted AAPT to confirm whether the dump is its data.

There appear to be passwords in the dump. In the information leaked to Pastebin, these passwords appear to be stored in plaintext, but completely random, consisting of upper- and lower-case characters and between 8 and 11 characters in length, indicating these users were assigned passwords or the passwords were disguised in some way. But in the dumped files, there are over a thousand passwords which aren’t random and appear to be user defined.

Although Anonymous Australia previously stated it would strip personal information from the data, there is still some left in the dump files.

This information includes the date of birth and marital status for many business customer account contacts, which could potentially provide would-be attackers with enough information to steal someone’s identity.

The group has since made its first press release regarding the attack and uploaded a video to YouTube to explain its motives. The group states that “Australia feels the need to censor and filter every day social and personal life” and that due to this, Anonymous is “disgusted from this decision, based upon power, money, and greed”.

Full Article Here – http://www.zdnet.com/au/anonymous-begins-dump-of-stolen-isp-data-7000001749/

Rights groups eye ‘superheroes’ for Internet defense

AFP
July 20, 2012

The Internet’s “superheroes” are rallying to defend online freedom, while taking a page from Hollywood’s playbook.
The launch set Thursday of the Internet Defense League coincides with the US release of the new Batman filmThe Dark Knight Rises,” and will use a bat — er, cat signal — to highlight the campaign.
“While member sites broadcast the news online, we blast our ‘cat signal’ into the sky with crowd-funded spotlights in cities around the world (on Batman’s opening night!),” the league’s Web page said.

The league, which aims to crush attacks on online freedom anywhere in the world, has several dozen participating organizations, including the Mozilla Foundation, Computer & Communications Industry Association and Electronic Frontier Foundation.
Representative Darrell Issa also voiced support for the effort, joining a conference call to promote the effort.

“Thanks for having me and let’s keep the web #open,” he said in a tweet.

The New America Foundation, a Washington think tank, said the IDL‘s goal was to “sound the alarm quickly to millions of users, through what people are calling the IDL ‘a bat-signal for the Internet.’”

Launch events were planned in San Francisco, New York, Washington, London and Ulan Bator.

Rainey Reitman, a member of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and of the defense league’s steering committee, said much of the energy for the new movement came from the campaign to defeat the Stop Online Piracy Act.
Reitman said the campaign aims to keep a watch out for threats to a free Internet anywhere in the world.
“One country can pass legislation that can affect anyone who is trying to access websites hosted in that country,” she said.